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Fitness Reads: Walk to better health and break the rules

Could a few minutes of walking a day can help reduce obesity in this country? Plus, learn how exercise can sharpen your mind.


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What did the SNEWS team read this week that other industry insiders might find interesting? Read on to find out.

  • Nowadays we can jump in our cars to go any distance — and we do. But maybe we shouldn’t, especially when the bank is across the street and the market is a bike ride away. This Livestrong story says just a bit of peppy walking per day could reduce obesity in the United States. Something as small as a five-minute walk after every meal is enough to make an impact.
  • Anything is possible. Just ask wheelchair bodybuilding and calisthenics champion Josh Rucker. In 2002, Rucker was in a car accident. First responders pronounced him dead on the scene, but by some miracle, he survived. He was 18 years old at the time, and doctors told him he’d never walk again. He decided to accept it and move on, finding something different to do with his life — including wheelchair basketball, a sport that paid his way through college. He began to body build post-college after watching a wheelchair bodybuilding YouTube video, and since has claimed several titles. Check out this interview with him from the Iron Company.
  • Rules are made for breaking, right? That’s what this post on Yoga Journal said. Last week, we wrote about how yoga is a hot category in both the outdoor and fitness industries, so direct customers to this post as there are a few yoga rules dying to be broken, including practicing on a hardwood floor in slippery socks.
  • Speaking of yoga, this post on Sage Rountree previews the book “The Runner’s Guide to Yoga,” which not only explains the benefits of practicing yoga as a runner, but also has photographs of more than 100 poses to help make runners stronger and faster.
  • Environmental concern has moved from being a fad to being essential to our lives. Consumers are swapping steel for plastic and organic for mass-grown at every turn, so naturally they’ll want some eco-friendly workout gear. Check out this story on MSN about the 21 top eco-friendly fitness products including the New Balance newSKY Shoe and the Nau Double Back Tank.
  • Exercise doesn’t just make your body better, it improves your mind, too, according to this story in Men’s Fitness. According to the story, workouts help ease anxiety, make you more productive and boost your decision-making abilities.
  • Childhood obesity is a growing concern. Kids these days don’t have the chance our generation did, because not every public school offers physical education anymore. The responsibility falls on families to keep kids active through things like soccer or intense playing on the jungle gym. Check out this Runner’s World article highlighting reasons to keep your kids healthy and active.
  • We’ve brought you a few articles about which shoes your customers should wear while doing the mega-popular CrossFit workout, but our sister publication The Box Magazine, which is for CrossFit enthusiasts, brings you the knowledge on just what clothing to direct your customers to in this article.
  • So this Active Times story claims to have found the solution for avoiding holiday weight gain — accidentally taking a workout DVD that’s above the level you’re currently at. This author was in the process of doing the popular DVD series Insanity, and grabbed “Max Recovery” instead of the “Core Cardio and Balance” DVD she should have packed. Check out her experience and get some tips, in case your customers are working out beyond their current fitness level.
  • Distance runners and sprinters are on two separate planets usually, but according to this Competitor article distance runners have more to learn from sprinters than they might think. A lot of if has to do with the biomechanics of the running form. The article offers exercises and tips on how to have form more like a sprinter to improve distance performance.

Did you read anything interesting this week? Share it with us!

–Compiled by Ana Trujillo