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Pass the word: Working out saves money

The next time you have a customer in your store hemming and hawing about the high cost of a treadmill, tell 'em working out (and eating right) will ultimately save them money – hundreds and maybe thousands of dollars, in fact.


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The next time you have a customer in your store hemming and hawing about the high cost of a treadmill, tell ’em working out (and eating right) will ultimately save them money – hundreds and maybe thousands of dollars, in fact.

Money Magazine reported that men and women who maintain healthy weight, healthy blood pressure and healthy cholesterol save, on average, an additional $615 per year on life insurance. On average, an obese person racks up $900 more a year in medical expenses than a person of normal weight, said a health economist at RTI International, a research and technology company specializing in health.

Slimming down substantially will also help shrink your clothing budget. Regular-size clothing is 10 percent to 15 percent less expensive than plus-size clothes for women and those labeled “big and tall” for men. And if you think that tall caramel Frappuccino-blended coffee with whipped cream at Starbucks is worth it, think again. On average they cost $3.70 and contain 320 calories. The same size brewed coffee, taken black, costs $2 less and has just five calories — making the switch will save $500 and slim some down 23 pounds a year.

Money Magazine estimates between healthier habits, lowered medical bills and insurance premiums, and losing weight, some people can save up to $7,868 in a year.